Food Security

Food Security

Food Security

The work towards supporting resilience in food security covers the following projects:

  Project Short Description 2017-18
  Relief Work Health and Hope Myanmar's unique position of having long established relationships with village leaders and the support of a vast network of volunteers has provided the opportunity and means to document, advocate for and where necessary, delivery food aid to remote rural areas where other International NGOs and the government are unable to reach. As required
  Crop Diversification and Increasing Agricultural Yield A project in partnership with Mission East, a Danish international NGO and the Mara Evangelical Church. This project aims to instigate a shift to a sustainable agricultural methodology called Something to Eat Every Day (SEED). Ongoing

Relief Work

Two major natural disasters, coupled with deforestation, a longer monsoon period and changes in climate have caused major challenges to ongoing food security within Chin State over the last ten years.

Most recently, in July 2015, cyclone Komen caused devastation across the region destroying approximately 75% of the harvest and creating an acute need for short-term food aid. Health and Hope Myanmar provided the equivalent of 18,200 people with one month’s food supply, in addition to providing key supplements for infants under 5 and women in pregnancy. The relief work bridged the gap for those who had to work hard to recover their land and plant new crops before the monsoon season arrived.


Crop Diversification and Increasing Agricultural Yield

This project is being undertaken in partnership with Mission East and Together for Sustainable Development (TSD). Villagers in southern Chin State experience chronic food insecurity due to climate change, slash and burn rotational farming, lack of skills and equipment, lack of knowledge on sustainable farming and nutritious food preparation, and a lack of market opportunities. This project aims to instigate a shift to a sustainable agricultural methodology called Something to Eat Every Day (SEED), cooperating with and training Family Farmer Groups and women’s Self-Help Groups through model farms piloted by 130 families in 4 villages.